APRIL 14, 2013

SCHEDULE OF DIVINE SERVICES

The Vilnius (Vilna) Icon of the Mother of God was painted by the holy Evangelist Luke

The Vilnius (Vilna) Icon of the Mother of God was painted by the holy Evangelist Luke

5th Week of Great Lent

 

4th  SUNDAY OF GREAT LENT –Tone 4 –St. John Climacus

Saturday, April 13  

  • 5 PM  Great Vespers and Confessions

Sunday, April 14

  • 9:45 AM  Hours – Reader Aaron Gray
  • 10 AM  Divine Liturgy of St. Basil the Great

Epistle Reader – Reader Aaron Gray

EPISTLE: Hebrews 6:13-20  *  GOSPEL: Mark 9:17-31

  •  5 PM  Lenten Vespers at St. Nicholas Church (Mogadore, OH)

Wednesday, April 17

  • 6 PM  Liturgy of the Presanctified Gifts

Friday, April 19

  • 6 PM  Akathist to the Most-Holy Lady Theotokos
Let us pray for the Armed Forces.

For those serving in the armed forces, let us pray to the Lord.

 

REMEMBER THOSE SERVING IN THE ARMED FORCES

Anthony Freude

Son of  Fr. Don and Popadia Donna Freude

Egor  Cravcenco

Son of Serghei and Ludmila Cavcenco

 

 

 

 

REMEMBER OUR SICK AND SHUT-INS  *

  • Mickey Stokich

    For the sick and the suffering, let us pray to the Lord.

    For the sick and the suffering, let us pray to the Lord.

  • Tom Hagerman
  • Leonora Evancho
  • Bessie Alexandrovich
  • Larissa Freude
  • Christina Paluch Collins
  • Anastasia Haymon
  • Nicholas Dimoff
  • Veronica Dameff
  • Joseph Boyle, Sr. (father of Kathy Gray)
  • Joseph Boyle, brother of Kathy Gray (Ann Arbor, Michigan)

 

 
*For more contact information of any of the above people (greeting cards, visiting, etc.),
please speak with Father Don. St. Elia will NEVER publish private information that pertains to our parishioners on our website.

 

"Oh taste and see how good the Lord is!"

Prosphora Offering by Michele Lambo

 

Today's coffee hour is provided by the Gray Family.  Thank you from your fellow parishioners!

Today’s coffee hour is provided by the Gray Family. Thank you from your fellow parishioners!

 

Be a part of the ancient tradition that was started by the Myrrh-bearing Women at the tomb of our Lord.

Be a part of the ancient tradition that was started by the Myrrh-bearing Women at the tomb of our Lord.

 

Grave Watch Vigil

A sign-up sheet is located at the candle desk for parishioners to reserve their block of time.  For complete information regarding this angelic and divine practice of the Eastern Orthodox Church, click HERE or type the following address into your web browser:   http://saintelia.com/2013-grave-watch-vigil/.

Pussy Willows needed for Palm Sunday

Palms, along with Pussy Willows (if available), will be blessed on Palm Sunday, April 28Please let Father Don know if you can bring some willows for Palm Sunday.

 

If you can donate some pussy willows, please let Father Don know. Thank you, everyone.

If you can donate some pussy willows, please let Father Don know. Thank you, everyone.

Good Friday and Pascha Flowers

Flowers adorned the Cross on the Sunday of the Veneration of the Holy Cross, April 7th and will adorn the tomb of our Lord on Good Friday, May 3rd ; and the Altar on Holy Pascha, May 5th .

Please make your donations at the candle Desk for the flowers and decorations for these celebrations.

This Week's Feast Days & Scripture Readings

This Week’s Feast Days & Scripture Readings

Monday, April 15– Apostles of the Seventy,  Aristarchus, Pudens, and Trophimus– Strict Fast

6th Hour: Isaiah 37:33-8:6  Vespers: Genesis 13:12-16  Proverbs: 14:27-15:4

Tuesday, April 16 – Virgin martyrs Agape, Irene and Chioris  –  Strict Fast

6th Hour: Isaiah 40:18-31  Vespers: Genesis 15:1-15; Proverbs 15:7-9

Wednesday,  April 17 – Hieromartyr Simeon, Bishop in Persia – Strict Fast

6th Hour: Isaiah 41:4-14   Vespers: Genesis 17:1-9  Proverbs 15:20-16:9

Thursday, April 18 – Venerable John of Decapolis – Strict Fast

6th Hour: Isaiah 42:5-16  Vespers: Genesis 18:20-33; Proverbs 16:17-17:17

Friday, April 19 – Ven. John of the Ancient Caves in Palestine   – Strict Fast

6th Hour: Isaiah 45:11-17  Vespers: Genesis 22:1-18  Proverbs 17:17-8:15

Saturday, April 20 – Saturday of the Most-holy Lady Theotkos and Ever-virgin Mary. Venerable Theodore Trichinas the Ermit– Strict Fast

Hebrews 9:24-28  Mark 8:27-31

 

UPPER ROOM WEEKLY REFLECTION:

 An earthly sigh regarding the practice of fasting…”What goes into one’s mouth is just as important as what comes out of one’s mouth.”

 

4th Sunday of Great Lent: St John Climacus

The Fourth Sunday of Lent is dedicated to St John of the Ladder (Climacus), the author of the work, The Ladder of Divine Ascent.  The abbot of St Catherine’s Monastery on Mount Sinai (6th century) stands as a witness to the violent effort needed for entrance into God’s Kingdom (Mt.10: 12).  The spiritual struggle of the Christian life is a real one, “not against flesh and blood, but against…the rulers of the present darkness…the hosts of wickedness in heavenly places…” (Eph 6:12).  Saint John Climacus encourages the faithful in their efforts, for according to the Lord only “he who endures to the end will be saved” (Mt.24:13).

Dweller of the desert and angel in the body, you were shown to be a wonder-worker, our God-bearing Father John. You received heavenly gifts through fasting, vigil, and prayer:  healing the sick and the souls of those drawn to you by faith. / Glory to Him who gave you strength! Glory to Him who granted you a crown!  Glory to Him who through you grants healing to all!

Dweller of the desert and angel in the body, you were shown to be a wonder-worker, our God-bearing Father John. You received heavenly gifts through fasting, vigil, and prayer: healing the sick and the souls of those drawn to you by faith. Glory to Him who gave you strength! Glory to Him who granted you a crown! Glory to Him who through you grants healing to all!

 


†NEXT WEEK†

5th  SUNDAY OF GREAT LENT –Tone 4 –St. Mary of Egypt

Saturday, April 20

† 5:00 pm  Great Vespers and Confessions

Sunday, April 21

† 9:45 am Hours – Reader Michael Luc

† 10:00 am Divine Liturgy of St. Basil the Great

Epistle Reader – Reader Michael Luc  ~*~ EPISTLE: Hebrews 9:11-14  GOSPEL: Mark 10:32-45

†  5:00 PM  Lenten Vespers at St George Church

 

A Modern Experience in the Tenth Century

This weekly bulletin insert complements the curriculum published by the Department of Christian Education of the Orthodox Church in America. This and many other Christian Education resources are available at http://dce.oca.org.
On April 19 we remember Saint Tryphon, Patriarch of Constantinople. He served during the tenth-century reign of Romanus, who ruled the Byzantine or Eastern Empire.

From his early years, Tryphon wanted only to be a simple monk. He chose to live without anything beyond his basic needs, and became known for his even-tempered approach to life. He didn’t argue or debate with people, and his peaceful nature accepted the events of life as the will of God.

Tryphon is notable among the saints because, unlike many, his life did not end in torture and violence. What did happen to him is more like something that happens often in our own day. He was undermined by dishonest people who cleverly manipulated him, taking advantage of his trust and honesty and trustfulness for their own benefit.

Emperor Romanus had a son, Theophylact, and for some reason was determined to appoint him as Patriarch. But because the boy was so young, Romanus asked Tryphon, by that time a seasoned and respected monk, to serve until the boy was old enough to take the position. Tryphon accepted the appointment, perhaps not knowing the emperor’s whole plan, and served as Patriarch for three years.

He became greatly loved by the people, who appreciated his modest way of speaking, his kindness and his simple manner of living.

When Theophylact turned twenty, the emperor was eager to have him become Patriarch, and asked Tryphon to step aside. But the monk could see that the young man wasn’t ready, and that to appoint him would be harmful to the Church. So he refused to leave the Patriarchate.

Romanus tried to find a way of accusing Tryphon of some wrongdoing, so as to get rid of him, but there simply wasn’t anything he could use. So he turned to a bishop who was willing to gain his favor by taking part in a deceitful plan.

This bishop pretended to be Tryphon’s friend, and asked him to write his name and full title as Patriarch on a sheet of paper. The signature was necessary, the bishop told him, to disprove rumors that Tryphon was illiterate and unfit for his high position.

Suspecting nothing, Tryphon did as he was asked. The dishonest bishop took the paper to the emperor, who had him compose and write, above the signature, a statement of resignation. The document was used to depose Tryphon, despite objections from his many followers. He was sent back to the monastery where he had lived years earlier.

The members of the Church in Constantinople then lived through a difficult period of distrust toward the imperial government and their own leaders. Yet Saint Tryphon’s humble acceptance of his unjust treatment was an example of Christlike endurance. The people who loved him learned from it, and those who deceived him were shamed by it. To this day in our churches, the humble monk is honored as no corrupt bishop or devious emperor can ever hope to be.

Leave a Comment

*